Massimo's training log

Brothers in arms, we share our progress and face adversity side by side. Each of us is strong. All of us are stronger.
User avatar
Massimo Kokhno
Posts: 187
Joined: Wed Jan 02, 2019 1:55 pm

Re: Massimo's training log

Post by Massimo Kokhno » Sat Nov 14, 2020 12:41 am

The pulleys are useful because aside from attaching the rings to your belt and getting a 50%bw reduction (where adding load to increase the difficulty might be impractical because you have to add 100%bw to get to the unassisted equivalent), you can hang the rings normally and attach the belt to any amount of counterweight, and it might be useful for bent arm strength too because you can get a feel for the specific movement pattern.

I have slightly modified my upper routine, moving to 3x3 for all exercises and replacing planche raises with pseudo planche push ups. For now I can see improvements over the weeks because I got the partial one arm chin with the ring slightly higher than before. Being able to fully dissipate fatigue and limit the risk of overuse injuries is definitely an advantage of low frequency, and it leaves a lot of free time for handstands or other sports or non-physical activity.

Also I have achieved a Nordic curl with unsupported kneecaps, straight leg strength like the elbows in the planche and iron cross. My tendons felt fine, and now I'd like to create some kind of imitation of Michael Jackson's shoes that he used for his lean so that I can do a Nordic curl with only the feet supported. I'll have to find ideas for that, maybe using straps somehow.

Here's videos related to my training this week:


User avatar
Vagabond
Site Admin
Posts: 834
Joined: Sun Nov 18, 2018 3:17 am

Re: Massimo's training log

Post by Vagabond » Thu Nov 19, 2020 3:32 am

Massimo Kokhno wrote: Sat Nov 14, 2020 12:41 am Also I have achieved a Nordic curl with unsupported kneecaps, straight leg strength like the elbows in the planche and iron cross. My tendons felt fine, and now I'd like to create some kind of imitation of Michael Jackson's shoes that he used for his lean so that I can do a Nordic curl with only the feet supported. I'll have to find ideas for that, maybe using straps somehow.
That's a really cool idea! I think that it should involve ankle and heel support. Like, have something to brace the front of your ankles against, and something to hold your heels down. A strap could work, but the best would be something solid so that you can place the bottom of your feet flat against to prevent any slippage.

User avatar
Against Gravity
Posts: 599
Joined: Mon Dec 31, 2018 12:21 pm

Re: Massimo's training log

Post by Against Gravity » Sat Nov 21, 2020 11:36 am

Massimo Kokhno wrote: Sat Nov 14, 2020 12:41 am I have slightly modified my upper routine, moving to 3x3 for all exercises and replacing planche raises with pseudo planche push ups. For now I can see improvements over the weeks because I got the partial one arm chin with the ring slightly higher than before. Being able to fully dissipate fatigue and limit the risk of overuse injuries is definitely an advantage of low frequency, and it leaves a lot of free time for handstands or other sports or non-physical activity.
I think another big benefit of low frequency / low volume training is that it allows you to max out RPE. I mean: you'll surely end up hitting failure, or getting as close to it as you can, in those exercises. This factor alone (increased effort, or proximity to failure), allows for many extra sessions of potential progress. If you were previously training more frequently, or for many sets, it's very likely your RPE wasn't max in every set. Thus, just increasing RPE, will make you observe progress.

The question is: what happens once you reach RPE 10 (or RIR 0)?
Since gaining more muscle mass is pretty hard for a constant (non-increasing) low volume-low frequency training, you'll be completely dependant of new neuromuscular adaptations for your current muscle mass.

And this is the interesting thing. For how long can you still get new neuromuscular adaptations?
Keep updating the log and we'll see. Ideally, record on video every session.

Plus, over time you can make a compilation of your progress by selecting the best set (usually first one), and only when there's a somewhat clear progression from the previous sessions. So, for example, say in week/microcycle 1 the ROM of your OAC improves; then in week/microcycles 2-5 stay constant; and in week/microcycle 6 ROM improves a little again. In the compilation, you'd show just microcycle 1 and microcycle 6. The idea is to observe the tiny neuromuscular adaptations that normally occur slowly over time in fast motion

Plus, it helps to ensure progress is caused by increased forces, instead increased cheating. Sadly, progressive cheating (instead progressive overload) is too common for us, strength athletes - and the only way to tell for sure, is a video!

User avatar
Massimo Kokhno
Posts: 187
Joined: Wed Jan 02, 2019 1:55 pm

Re: Massimo's training log

Post by Massimo Kokhno » Tue Dec 29, 2020 3:08 pm

Hi, it's been a while since the last update. I wasn't feeling great emotionally, like some kind of darkness taking away motivation to interact with others and to work on on online posts. Still, I made an updated list here of links to videos of the hardest leg moves I've seen. I'm working a new edition of the upper body list.

I've trained upper/lower every 5-10 days, and weight was more or less similar, in the 80-83kg/176-182lbs range. My sleep schedule was still mostly messed up, sleeping late. Who knows how much harm I've done to myself with years of disrupted circadian rhythm.

I found a post on Reddit that links to a good summary of the high intensity low frequency approach I use. It's true the sets are RIR 0, and they can be extended by dropping to a less intense variation or with rest-pause, and the low frequency allows to dissipate all the fatigue and limit the risk of overuse injuries.

If the adaptations are only neurological and there's no muscle growth then at some point I'll hit a plateau. According to Naterman in this article about periodization and training different qualities, neurological adaptations can be maxed out in 3 months, though it's not specified if it's by training near maximum recoverable volume.

Some people have been training for more than a year with this method and have reached moves like the one arm chin up, so I don't know if it also builds some muscle mass, I need to look up more about it. And also to read about high intensity training since it seems like it had some ideas in common, though it didn't use this kind of accommodating resistance.

My routine is mostly the same, but for one arm pull ups I've switched from hand assisted to only using one leg as assist, I try to make the foot slide or hop to keep the line of pull as similar as possible as unassisted, I like this new variation more so we'll see if it works. And I've switched to decline Nordic curls with the highest slope the stairs allow because I can do 3 sets of 3 so I can just work on reducing hip bend, it will be interesting to see how much they transfer to flat ground vs fully inverted. I haven't found a way to do the horizontal hold supported only at the ankles, when I tried with straps the pressure was too high even with some padding.

For now that's all, maybe I'll make another update soon since on the last day of 2020 I'll probably train.

User avatar
Vagabond
Site Admin
Posts: 834
Joined: Sun Nov 18, 2018 3:17 am

Re: Massimo's training log

Post by Vagabond » Sun Feb 14, 2021 4:28 am

Thanks for the update, Massimo! Interesting experiments you're doing.

Regarding the mental difficulties... It happens, man. To me, as well. Lots of people died around me lately, and it impacted my inner fire for a couple of months. We have to be patient with ourselves, remember that we enjoy training and other things as well, and that eventually, we'll get back into it all with the same passion. It's just a matter of time.

User avatar
Massimo Kokhno
Posts: 187
Joined: Wed Jan 02, 2019 1:55 pm

Re: Massimo's training log

Post by Massimo Kokhno » Mon Feb 15, 2021 10:27 pm

I'm feeling better this month, I hope you feel better too.

At the end of January I tested my ring chin up 1rm and also my dip with a dubious setup. With the chin up after 44kg I wanted to do 51kg next because I think I would have got it, and accidentally put on 53kg and got a half rep. In August 2020 I was barely able to bend the elbows with 2.5kg less total load, and did a full rep with 4.5kg less total load, so let's say the 1rm improved by something like 3kg in 5 months.

For dips I don't have data from around the period I started my low frequency experiment, last time was on September 2019 on parallel bars, while in this recent test it was a bit less stable but the form more or less similar, I got a rep with 66.5kg and then tried directly 74kg failing it. Based on perceived effort I think my 1rm is around 70kg, so that's an estimated 1rm improvement of 8kg in 16 months.

Video of the January test:


So the progress in basic strength without directly training it was very slow, but at least it's there, maybe not bad considering I trained every 7-10 days since summer of 2020. And I don't know how gradually I should have ramped up the weight between attempts in the test for best results.

Recently I noticed in the summary of the high intensity low frequency method from the previous post that it's advised to get 1 or more minute of time under tension in each set by using drop sets or rest-pause etc. if needed after the 3-6 main reps, and I was only doing sets of 3 grindy reps, which were more like 20-30 seconds per set.

So if I want to resume the low frequency experiment I'll keep that in mind since apparently I was doing this mistake, and I could make a Reddit post asking people who tried this method how their results were and how exactly they implemented sets/reps since Mindful Mover was vague about it and only the unofficial summary had advice about it. For now I've switched to training every 4-5 days with 3 sets of 4-6 for each upper body movement, with 1-3 reps in reserve instead of grinding to muscle failure.

Also for one arm pull ups I stopped with foot assistance, and instead now use a band on the wrist, the advantage for me is putting full load on the grip and rotation control of the main hand, and the pulling assistance is a bit more objective based on how much the band is stretched, so far it's my favorite pull up variation. The other exercises are deficit pike push ups with a float, front lever rows with more tuck at the top, deep pseudo planche push ups.

This is a video of my form (the L front lever touch was just a test at the start of that session, I did not try it in the next ones):


For legs at the moment I don't have a well defined routine, but I beat my medium form Nordic curls record by 1, and this time with less rest in the last reps, 1.6kg more body weight and after 3 sets of 3 decline Nordic curls instead of fresh at the start of the workout, so not bad, I'll keep working on seeing how far I can go with the variations of this movement.

Video of the record:


That's it for now, I try to keep a positive attitude and enjoy training.

User avatar
Vagabond
Site Admin
Posts: 834
Joined: Sun Nov 18, 2018 3:17 am

Re: Massimo's training log

Post by Vagabond » Tue Apr 06, 2021 9:03 pm

Massimo Kokhno wrote: Mon Feb 15, 2021 10:27 pm Recently I noticed in the summary of the high intensity low frequency method from the previous post that it's advised to get 1 or more minute of time under tension in each set by using drop sets or rest-pause etc. if needed after the 3-6 main reps, and I was only doing sets of 3 grindy reps, which were more like 20-30 seconds per set.

So if I want to resume the low frequency experiment I'll keep that in mind since apparently I was doing this mistake, and I could make a Reddit post asking people who tried this method how their results were and how exactly they implemented sets/reps since Mindful Mover was vague about it and only the unofficial summary had advice about it. For now I've switched to training every 4-5 days with 3 sets of 4-6 for each upper body movement, with 1-3 reps in reserve instead of grinding to muscle failure.

Also for one arm pull ups I stopped with foot assistance, and instead now use a band on the wrist, the advantage for me is putting full load on the grip and rotation control of the main hand, and the pulling assistance is a bit more objective based on how much the band is stretched, so far it's my favorite pull up variation. The other exercises are deficit pike push ups with a float, front lever rows with more tuck at the top, deep pseudo planche push ups.
Oh wow, I never got the notification of your response via Tapatalk. :o Hey, at least you did improve! The difference between 20-30s TUT and 60+s is pretty big!

For the one arm pull-up, I'm not too sure I understand what you mean. Do you tie the band to your wrist and place a foot in it? If so, it seems like an interesting way to do it! I'll go check your Instagram to see if you show it. If not, I'd love to see!

User avatar
Massimo Kokhno
Posts: 187
Joined: Wed Jan 02, 2019 1:55 pm

Re: Massimo's training log

Post by Massimo Kokhno » Sun Apr 11, 2021 4:36 pm

After you loop the band through the wrist you can grab it with the other hand or put it under a foot, I prefer the first option. A sock or strap can also be used, the only difference is that you don't have objective feedback on the amount of assistance based on the band thickness and stretch. Even a pulley could be attached to the wrist, in that case I'm not sure it would work well enough to be done for the added specificity of the movement compared to hanging it right next to the hand etc.

My method can be seen in the following video where I also show the exercises I used for the last 5 workouts, and some of them for longer than that.


Every 5 days one set of assisted half oap (currently one rep with the hand between the bicep and shoulder), 7-7-7-8 band on wrist OAP and deficit pike push ups with feet 4 stairs above hand (both movements are around 9-10rm), 7-8-8 slightly wide tuck front lever rows (9rm), 3x5 partially assisted tuck planche push ups (accommodating resistance, maybe 1-2 reps in reserve with the intensity of the last rep), supinated German hang stretch (when I recorded myself I saw the rings 90° between them and not in line as I was aiming for), one arm hang, some wrist and finger strengthening exercises.

Legs are also every 5 days, I experimented if for one leg Nordic curls the method of reaching gradually further with the nose and some hip bend worked and after 4 sessions I was able to do for the first time a straight body negative where with either leg I descended to knee lock out without the chest touching the floor.


Currently my exercises are 3 sets tuck one leg Nordic curls (new setup I found that works well to get the same knee rom as straight body), 1x5 Nordic curls as clean as possible, 3 sets natural leg extensions (limited not by strength but how many reps I can do without knee discomfort), side split stretch with sliders and when I want I also add straight single leg deadlifts for a hamstring stretch, 1x10 Jefferson curls for the spine and hamstrings/calves and one leg calf raises on a stair (currenly around 1x7 with 24.6kg/54lbs on my waist).

I've started a health log to track how the joints feel, mostly for the knees to get an idea of what movements aggravate or improve them over time. Seems like the patellar tendon is more or less fine, while I feel slight pain or pressure around or beneath the kneecap in some cases, sometimes randomly but not every day. With no warm up I can comfortably do deep squats, and with a small warm up I tested that I can do 9 natural leg extensions, a dozen pistol squats, an all out sprint, a few standing broad or high jumps and kicking a ball more than a hundred times. The goal is to keep improving knee function and not try the moves that injured me in the past until I feel nothing when doing slightly easier moves.

Also I'd like to test some things like my standing vertical, 100m sprint and 40 yard dash to see how much transfer I got from my strength training, my best idea to do it without buying any additional equipment is to record myself and go frame by frame to determine the start and finish points, then for the vertical I can use the formula height = 1/2 * gravity acceleration * the square of the time spent going up (so half the time between take off and landing). There would be some limitations like the fact that if I touch down with bent knees I'd get an artificially longer air time, determining the exact start and finish frame in sprints and some amount of error based on frame rate, but I don't have better ideas for now.