Massimo's training log

Brothers in arms, we share our progress and face adversity side by side. Each of us is strong. All of us are stronger.
User avatar
Massimo Kokhno
Posts: 182
Joined: Wed Jan 02, 2019 1:55 pm

Re: Massimo's training log

Post by Massimo Kokhno » Sat Nov 14, 2020 12:41 am

The pulleys are useful because aside from attaching the rings to your belt and getting a 50%bw reduction (where adding load to increase the difficulty might be impractical because you have to add 100%bw to get to the unassisted equivalent), you can hang the rings normally and attach the belt to any amount of counterweight, and it might be useful for bent arm strength too because you can get a feel for the specific movement pattern.

I have slightly modified my upper routine, moving to 3x3 for all exercises and replacing planche raises with pseudo planche push ups. For now I can see improvements over the weeks because I got the partial one arm chin with the ring slightly higher than before. Being able to fully dissipate fatigue and limit the risk of overuse injuries is definitely an advantage of low frequency, and it leaves a lot of free time for handstands or other sports or non-physical activity.

Also I have achieved a Nordic curl with unsupported kneecaps, straight leg strength like the elbows in the planche and iron cross. My tendons felt fine, and now I'd like to create some kind of imitation of Michael Jackson's shoes that he used for his lean so that I can do a Nordic curl with only the feet supported. I'll have to find ideas for that, maybe using straps somehow.

Here's videos related to my training this week:


User avatar
Vagabond
Site Admin
Posts: 827
Joined: Sun Nov 18, 2018 3:17 am

Re: Massimo's training log

Post by Vagabond » Thu Nov 19, 2020 3:32 am

Massimo Kokhno wrote: Sat Nov 14, 2020 12:41 am Also I have achieved a Nordic curl with unsupported kneecaps, straight leg strength like the elbows in the planche and iron cross. My tendons felt fine, and now I'd like to create some kind of imitation of Michael Jackson's shoes that he used for his lean so that I can do a Nordic curl with only the feet supported. I'll have to find ideas for that, maybe using straps somehow.
That's a really cool idea! I think that it should involve ankle and heel support. Like, have something to brace the front of your ankles against, and something to hold your heels down. A strap could work, but the best would be something solid so that you can place the bottom of your feet flat against to prevent any slippage.

User avatar
Against Gravity
Posts: 598
Joined: Mon Dec 31, 2018 12:21 pm

Re: Massimo's training log

Post by Against Gravity » Sat Nov 21, 2020 11:36 am

Massimo Kokhno wrote: Sat Nov 14, 2020 12:41 am I have slightly modified my upper routine, moving to 3x3 for all exercises and replacing planche raises with pseudo planche push ups. For now I can see improvements over the weeks because I got the partial one arm chin with the ring slightly higher than before. Being able to fully dissipate fatigue and limit the risk of overuse injuries is definitely an advantage of low frequency, and it leaves a lot of free time for handstands or other sports or non-physical activity.
I think another big benefit of low frequency / low volume training is that it allows you to max out RPE. I mean: you'll surely end up hitting failure, or getting as close to it as you can, in those exercises. This factor alone (increased effort, or proximity to failure), allows for many extra sessions of potential progress. If you were previously training more frequently, or for many sets, it's very likely your RPE wasn't max in every set. Thus, just increasing RPE, will make you observe progress.

The question is: what happens once you reach RPE 10 (or RIR 0)?
Since gaining more muscle mass is pretty hard for a constant (non-increasing) low volume-low frequency training, you'll be completely dependant of new neuromuscular adaptations for your current muscle mass.

And this is the interesting thing. For how long can you still get new neuromuscular adaptations?
Keep updating the log and we'll see. Ideally, record on video every session.

Plus, over time you can make a compilation of your progress by selecting the best set (usually first one), and only when there's a somewhat clear progression from the previous sessions. So, for example, say in week/microcycle 1 the ROM of your OAC improves; then in week/microcycles 2-5 stay constant; and in week/microcycle 6 ROM improves a little again. In the compilation, you'd show just microcycle 1 and microcycle 6. The idea is to observe the tiny neuromuscular adaptations that normally occur slowly over time in fast motion

Plus, it helps to ensure progress is caused by increased forces, instead increased cheating. Sadly, progressive cheating (instead progressive overload) is too common for us, strength athletes - and the only way to tell for sure, is a video!